Author Archives: Rebecca Hein

About Rebecca Hein

Author of A Case Of Brilliance, her memoir of her discovery that her two children are profoundly gifted

Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Six

Yet another slowing-down force in the life of a gifted child is over-stimulation. Where a student of normal IQ walks into a classroom and is reasonably comfortable, gifted children are hit with multiple waves of sensation. The light may hurt … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Five

Part of my problem in math class, in addition to divergent thinking, was my need to work things out for myself. I had to explore, to my full satisfaction, all those ramifications and implications about language. I didn’t want any … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Four

Complex thinking is just one example of a force that can take the attention of gifted children away from their schoolwork. Divergent thinking can exert an equally powerful pull. A divergent thinker, unlikely to listen to the teacher, may fall … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Three

As noted, thinking is a favorite pursuit of gifted children, one that takes their minds away from class activities and sometimes the whole curriculum. And if thinking is a problem, complex thinking is even more so. The complex thinker loses … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Two

Highly gifted children are always thinking. It’s a fascinating activity, more interesting than what the teacher is saying, so why should they listen? Then, what the teacher taught is on the test and these students get bad grades. Not because … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part One

We all know the stereotype: gifted children get good grades, achieve ahead of their age-peers, and in other ways are academically successful. Yet this isn’t always true. The unusual learning styles and thought processes of so many gifted children are … Continue reading

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Creativity and Your Gifted Child, Part Five

To help gifted children achieve flow, parents and teachers need to understand that state and if possible, experience it themselves. Flow requires an absolute release of normal attention and this means you have to trust the process first, and later … Continue reading

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Creativity and Your Gifted Child, Part Four

There’s more than one way to solve technical problems in music performance, writing, and other disciplines—a better way than the traditional route that divides the mind between the experience of performance and evaluating that performance. That way is flow.   … Continue reading

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Creativity and Your Gifted Child, Part Three

High-level skill in music, writing, and other disciplines requires hard work and close monitoring of your progress. The object is to hold yourself to a high standard, and compare your own performance with that standard. With the resulting information, you … Continue reading

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Creativity and Your Gifted Child, Part Two

Gifted children are typically whole in their attention when their interest is engaged. They don’t often suffer from the adult tendency to stand aside from an activity, observing their work while they are also performing it. Thus, at their deepest … Continue reading

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