Category Archives: Damage in Gifted Children

Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Six

Yet another slowing-down force in the life of a gifted child is over-stimulation. Where a student of normal IQ walks into a classroom and is reasonably comfortable, gifted children are hit with multiple waves of sensation. The light may hurt … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Five

Part of my problem in math class, in addition to divergent thinking, was my need to work things out for myself. I had to explore, to my full satisfaction, all those ramifications and implications about language. I didn’t want any … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Four

Complex thinking is just one example of a force that can take the attention of gifted children away from their schoolwork. Divergent thinking can exert an equally powerful pull. A divergent thinker, unlikely to listen to the teacher, may fall … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Three

As noted, thinking is a favorite pursuit of gifted children, one that takes their minds away from class activities and sometimes the whole curriculum. And if thinking is a problem, complex thinking is even more so. The complex thinker loses … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Two

Highly gifted children are always thinking. It’s a fascinating activity, more interesting than what the teacher is saying, so why should they listen? Then, what the teacher taught is on the test and these students get bad grades. Not because … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part One

We all know the stereotype: gifted children get good grades, achieve ahead of their age-peers, and in other ways are academically successful. Yet this isn’t always true. The unusual learning styles and thought processes of so many gifted children are … Continue reading

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Reversing Damage, Part Five: Self-concept

When a smart child is underperforming, as my cello student Tom was, the damage goes far beyond his grades and general academic achievement. Tom was fourteen when we began our right-brain experiments in his cello lessons, and he’d long ago … Continue reading

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Reversing Damage, Part Four: Focus isn’t Everything

As we have seen, a simple change in Tom’s style of thinking proved he could be a good student. For too many years he’d been forcing his brain into the conventional (and logical) high-focus mode, yet all this did was … Continue reading

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Reversing Damage, Part Three: Changing the Use of the Brain

When my cello student, Tom, started passing math, his success didn’t stop there. Through day-dreaming and other right-brain techniques in his music lessons, he also found that reading was fast and easy where previously it had been a chore so … Continue reading

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