Category Archives: Underachievement

The adolescent polymath

The polymath’s development throughout adolescence can bewilder parents even more than the toddler phase when an unusual level of clutter proliferates in the child’s life for no apparent reason. But since adolescence baffles and worries all parents, what’s different about … Continue reading

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The polymath in early grade school

As the young polymath reaches early grade school, his or her diverse interests begin to coalesce. Certain activities or subjects become compelling. If these don’t mesh with schoolwork, this can cause problems; so it’s important for parents to try to … Continue reading

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Good practice habits alone could have helped Joseph to develop his musical talent

Joseph, my talented high school student, went on to college before I could get him to change his deficient work habits. His undeveloped musical talent showed itself in the widely varying levels of skill within his technique: for example, his … Continue reading

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Undeveloped talent: “I can’t remember the last time I had to study for a test.”

Joseph, the student who could easily see the cello fingerboard in his head after hardly any practice, came to my studio when he was a high school junior. With only two years in which to influence him, I always felt … Continue reading

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What might have helped Writer B?

My acquaintance with Writer B taught me that a gift such as his must be guarded, nurtured, and if possible, developed with the most special care a parent or mentor can give. Had things been different for Writer B, his … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Six

Yet another slowing-down force in the life of a gifted child is over-stimulation. Where a student of normal IQ walks into a classroom and is reasonably comfortable, gifted children are hit with multiple waves of sensation. The light may hurt … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Four

Complex thinking is just one example of a force that can take the attention of gifted children away from their schoolwork. Divergent thinking can exert an equally powerful pull. A divergent thinker, unlikely to listen to the teacher, may fall … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Three

As noted, thinking is a favorite pursuit of gifted children, one that takes their minds away from class activities and sometimes the whole curriculum. And if thinking is a problem, complex thinking is even more so. The complex thinker loses … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Two

Highly gifted children are always thinking. It’s a fascinating activity, more interesting than what the teacher is saying, so why should they listen? Then, what the teacher taught is on the test and these students get bad grades. Not because … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part One

We all know the stereotype: gifted children get good grades, achieve ahead of their age-peers, and in other ways are academically successful. Yet this isn’t always true. The unusual learning styles and thought processes of so many gifted children are … Continue reading

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