Tag Archives: gifted children and underachievement

Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Six

Yet another slowing-down force in the life of a gifted child is over-stimulation. Where a student of normal IQ walks into a classroom and is reasonably comfortable, gifted children are hit with multiple waves of sensation. The light may hurt … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Three

As noted, thinking is a favorite pursuit of gifted children, one that takes their minds away from class activities and sometimes the whole curriculum. And if thinking is a problem, complex thinking is even more so. The complex thinker loses … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part Two

Highly gifted children are always thinking. It’s a fascinating activity, more interesting than what the teacher is saying, so why should they listen? Then, what the teacher taught is on the test and these students get bad grades. Not because … Continue reading

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Why Brilliant Children Often Appear Slow, Part One

We all know the stereotype: gifted children get good grades, achieve ahead of their age-peers, and in other ways are academically successful. Yet this isn’t always true. The unusual learning styles and thought processes of so many gifted children are … Continue reading

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Helping Your Gifted Right-Brain Learner, Part One: Daydreaming is Better than Direct Focus

If your gifted child is a daydreamer, he or she is almost certainly a right-brain learner. Therefore it’s necessary to nurture this style of thought, since right-brain learners are often misunderstood and made to learn in ways that actually work … Continue reading

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What’s Calling My Gifted Child the Loudest? Part Four: Achieving Balance

After my six-year-old son Lewis told me that woodworking was calling to him more loudly than cello playing, my husband began teaching him basic carpentry. He thrived under this instruction and was soon able to pay attention to other things. … Continue reading

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Is My Child Gifted? Part Four: Complex Thinking

If your child gets lost in his head, causing inattention in school and then bad grades, this may be a better indicator of giftedness than more obvious signs. Complex thinking is common among gifted children, and it can become a … Continue reading

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On Brilliance and Stubbornness

Beethoven’s teachers said of him, “…[he] was so headstrong and self-sufficient that he had to learn much through harsh experience which he had refused to accept when it was presented to him as a subject of study.” Since many bright … Continue reading

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Reversing Damage, Part Four: Focus isn’t Everything

As we have seen, a simple change in Tom’s style of thinking proved he could be a good student. For too many years he’d been forcing his brain into the conventional (and logical) high-focus mode, yet all this did was … Continue reading

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Reversing Damage, Part Two: Daydreaming as a Route to Academic Success

Tom, my cello student, flunked pre-algebra in eighth grade and so had to repeat it the next year. In the summer between, I taught him to daydream in his cello lessons, and also his practicing. This was a technique for … Continue reading

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