Tag Archives: right-brain

Having talent versus developing it

Talented people display innate ability, often from an early age, for an activity or academic subject that most others struggle with. Through years of cello teaching, I noticed these students because they could do certain things much more easily than … Continue reading

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Helping Your Gifted Right-Brain Learner, Part Four: Why Letting Go Works

If you let your gifted child daydream, he or she will achieve synthesis. Say your daughter is good in math. After working a series of difficult problems, she should let her mind wander off. This activates the right brain and … Continue reading

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Helping Your Gifted Right-Brain Learner, Part Three: Letting Go of What You Learned Yesterday

Years ago I discovered with my own cello playing that I shouldn’t try to build today’s practice session on what I learned yesterday. I always played better if I forgot about everything and just attuned myself to present sensations. When … Continue reading

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Helping Your Gifted Right-Brain Learner, Part Two: How the Right Brain Works

In The Right Brain, author Thomas Blakeslee states, “…each half of the brain has its own separate train of conscious thought and its own memories…while the left brain tends to think in words, the right brain thinks directly in sensory … Continue reading

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Helping Your Gifted Right-Brain Learner, Part One: Daydreaming is Better than Direct Focus

If your gifted child is a daydreamer, he or she is almost certainly a right-brain learner. Therefore it’s necessary to nurture this style of thought, since right-brain learners are often misunderstood and made to learn in ways that actually work … Continue reading

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Reversing Damage, Part Five: Self-concept

When a smart child is underperforming, as my cello student Tom was, the damage goes far beyond his grades and general academic achievement. Tom was fourteen when we began our right-brain experiments in his cello lessons, and he’d long ago … Continue reading

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